You may recall that last month, we celebrated the 20th anniversary of Peter Jackson’s The Fellowship of the Ring by sharing a bunch of quotes from the trilogy — including one of our very favorites from Gandalf, who wisely told Frodo: “All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.”

Well, here at Devolutions, we don’t wear grey or white robes, we don’t fly around on giant moths, and we don’t warn people that YOU SHALL NOT PASS! But we certainly do try to make the best of the time that is given us, which includes hiring the very best Software Developers to make our solutions even better. And today, it’s my privilege to introduce you to the newest member of our Software Development team: please say hello to Benoît Cortier!

I had the chance to chat with Benoît to learn more about his role, experience, and hobbies. Here’s a look at our conversation:

Can you tell me a bit about your background?

I began programming when I was 9 years old, starting with visual programming software, such as Scratch and GDevelop, which was formerly known as Game Develop. This led me to learn my first programming language, C, followed by PHP, Python, and C++ —using books that my father bought me.

In high school, I launched the Programming Club. I really enjoyed programming, and so I decided to enroll in an engineering school to study computer science and software engineering in a more structured and conventional way. I became involved with various research projects there and even got my name as a collaborator on a math paper. I also got the opportunity to go to Japan to work as an AI research intern. I graduated from a dual degree program — a French engineer diploma and a Canadian master’s level postgraduate diploma, both in computer science.

What would you say is your biggest achievement?

I would say passing the Japanese-Language Proficiency Test at the highest level, otherwise known as the JLPT N1, while completing my end-of-studies internship at the same time. I was learning Japanese alone since my internship in Japan, and I never took the lower exam — so it was kind of crazy. I was also writing my reports for both French engineering school and Canadian university at the same time. Those days were quite busy!

What was it about Devolutions that made you want to work here?

I came across a job posting for a C/Rust Developer. I was looking for my end-of-studies internship, and really liked using Rust for side projects and open source, so I asked if I could get the job as an intern. Working on remote access software also sounded very interesting.

What would you say are your top three strengths at work?

I would say my biggest strength is my ability to learn things quickly and independently. Also, I’m passionate about programming. I can get very focused and work non-stop. Finally, I would say that I’m really eager to help and mentor.

What tasks do you carry out in your job, and what are some of the tools you use?

As a Developer, I spend most of my time writing, reviewing, and debugging code. My biggest allies are my terminal, Alacritty, and my code editor, neovim. I’m currently working on pretty much all projects containing Rust code as a member of the Wayk Now team.

What is your impression of working here?

If we need something to get the job done, we get it. Management is very transparent; information such as strategy, plans, and transactions are all shared with employees. Last but not least, everyone is treated respectfully — intern or management, it doesn’t matter.

What goals would you like to achieve at Devolutions?

I would like to learn more and help create great software for our customers.

On a personal note, what are some of your hobbies and interests?

Other than computers, I am very excited about the Japanese language. I’m learning more and more each day. Languages are great in that they are pretty much all-purpose tools that you can use to enjoy other stuff. Reading was one of my hobbies from the start, but now I can read in Japanese as well, and discover new styles that I couldn’t appreciate in European languages. Learning new stuff in Japanese is also a way to have even more fun than just learning new stuff in my mother tongue. These days, I’m into Japanese prosody, which refers to intonation, stress pattern, loudness variations, pausing, and rhythm. I am training myself to read aloud while sounding as polished and professional as I can. Some day, I want to pass the Reading Proficiency Test, which is known as the roudokukentei.

Please share a few words with our community of IT pros:

It is really a pleasure to work with you all. I am honored and thankful to be part of this community.